Agenda and draft minutes

Venue: Bromley Civic Centre

Contact: Keith Pringle  020 8313 4508

Items
No. Item

57.

APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE AND NOTIFICATION OF SUBSTITUTE MEMBERS

Minutes:

Apologies were received from Cllr Terence Nathan.

 

58.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Minutes:

There were no declarations.

 

59.

QUESTIONS FROM COUNCILLORS AND MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC ATTENDING THE MEETING

In accordance with the Council’s Constitution, questions to this Committee must be received in writing four working days before the date of the meeting.  Therefore please ensure that questions are received by the Democratic Services Team by 5pm on Friday 9th March 2018.

Minutes:

There were no questions to the Committee.

 

60.

MINUTES OF THE ENVIRONMENT PDS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON 30TH JANUARY 2018 pdf icon PDF 361 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes were agreed.

 

In regard to recycling, Members received an oral update on the Council’s Recycling Behaviour Change Campaign.

 

L B Bromley had one of the highest recycling rates in London at 50%. But it was necessary to push above this level with a particular focus on recycling food waste which comprised an average 27% of a resident’s general waste. The Recycling/Food Waste campaign would be a targeted doorstep campaign with leaflets, information, food waste bags and food waste containers (where needed) provided to households. Information on the campaign had been circulated to Ward Members. It would focus on areas of lowest food waste recycling and include provision of a Recycle for London branded leaflet and 5,000 stickers and food waste bags. Grant funding of £15k had been made available for the campaign which would be of most benefit if undertaken during the (forthcoming) summer. Officers would go to the market in April 2018 to tender for an agency to conduct the campaign. 

 

In response to Member questions it was confirmed that a free cleaning programme is not provided for brown bins although a fee paying service can be offered. Research was also ongoing with partners to establish roads performing well on food waste recycling and those not performing so well. Generally, the borough’s more deprived and more wealthy areas were those that had lower rates of food waste recycling. 

 

61.

QUESTIONS TO THE PORTFOLIO HOLDER FROM MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC AND COUNCILLORS ATTENDING THE MEETING

In accordance with the Council’s Constitution, questions to the Portfolio Holder must be received in writing four working days before the date of the meeting. Therefore please ensure that questions are received by the Democratic Services Team by 5pm on Friday 9th March 2018.

Minutes:

A number of questions had been received and details of the questions and replies are at Appendix A.

 

62.

PRE-DECISION SCRUTINY OF REPORTS TO THE ENVIRONMENT PORTFOLIO HOLDER

Portfolio Holder decisions for pre-decision scrutiny.

63.

BUDGET MONITORING 2017/18 pdf icon PDF 225 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report FSD18032

 

Based on expenditure and activity levels to 31st December 2017, the latest budget monitoring position for 2017/18 for the Environment Portfolio showed an underspend of £797k, with the controllable budget projected to be underspent by £566k at year-end.

 

Details were provided of the projected outturn with a forecast of projected spend against each relevant service area compared to the latest approved budget. Background to variations was also outlined.

 

In view of extra green garden waste (GGW) income, a Member asked whether it would be possible to reinstate the former opening times of the garden waste site at Charles Darwin School, Biggin Hill. The Portfolio Holder reminded that a decision was previously taken on service provision for satellite GGW sites and extra income did not imply the service is making a profit. 

 

On variations due to staff vacancies, vacancies within Street Scene/Green Spaces and Parking had led to projected underspends of £99k and £55k respectively. Vacancies in Parking related to the shared service with L B Bexley and an outcome of the new contract; officers had previously managed in line with budget. Some of the vacancies were also due to staff turnover and it is necessary to consider staff (levels) and budget.

 

Concerning an overall Parking underspend of £288k (projected), income was expected to be £291k below budget (£53k related to a delay in rolling out additional on-street parking bays), partly offset by extra income from cashless parking fees at £62k and defaults applied to the contract at £159k (£23k defaults related to Off and On Street Parking and £136k defaults related to Parking Enforcement, the latter default partly offsetting a deficit of £190k which was projected from Parking Enforcement). Additionally, extra income of £40k had been received from charges to suspend parking restrictions along with £35k from parking permits. The staffing underspend at £55k along with other variations at Cr £18k completed the monitoring position for parking services. 

 

APCOA’s poor initial performance contributed to the Parking contract underspend (due to defaults). Car parks are also less used even though the car park estate remains constant and well maintained (including the receipt of awards) and charges have not recently changed; internet shopping also contributes to reduced car park use. Although the contract had robust Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), they could not be set to recover every loss and a far better performance was being sought for Parking Services.    

 

A Member advocated a more flexible charging approach at each car park based on supply and demand, suggesting that revenue could increase should some charges be reduced. 

 

The Portfolio Holder also took the opportunity to say that he had thanked staff and contractors for tackling the impact of recent severe weather. The Portfolio Holder paid tribute to the work of the Council’s Winter Service Team and Snow Friends in keeping the borough moving during the weather conditions. The Chairman added that she had received compliments related to the gritting service. 

 

RESOLVED that the Portfolio Holder be recommended to endorse the latest  ...  view the full minutes text for item 63.

64.

CAPITAL PROGRAMME MONITORING - 3RD QUARTER 2017/18 AND CAPITAL STRATEGY 2018 TO 2022 pdf icon PDF 183 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report FSD18025

 

At its meeting on 7th February 2018, the Executive agreed a revised Capital Programme from 2017/18 to 2021/22. Changes in respect of the Environment Portfolio were outlined and a revised programme for the portfolio presented. Report FSD18025 also included actual spend at third quarter stage and comments on progress for individual schemes/projects.

 

RESOLVED that the Portfolio Holder be recommended to note and confirm changes agreed by the Executive on 7th February 2018.

 

65.

HIGHWAY INVESTMENT pdf icon PDF 67 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report ES18020

 

Following the Council’s decision on 12th December 2016 to approve capital funding of £11.8m for investment in planned highway maintenance, Members considered planned schemes for the final phase (Phase 5) of the investment project. Works associated with the first four phases of the project had progressed well, and current commitments/expenditure at February 2018 totalled £7.74m for carriageways and £2.46m for footways.

 

Improving the condition of the borough’s non-principal and unclassified roads and footways would reduce reactive maintenance and enable annual revenue savings of £2.5m, totalling £12.5m over a five-year period from 2017/18 (partly offset by an estimated £167k reduction in treasury management income over the period).

 

Priorities for initial phases were based on a condition survey completed in October 2015 and a further borough-wide assessment recently commissioned identified carriageways and footways needing repair. Schemes for Phase 5 (estimated cost value at £1.6m) were identified as highest priorities in the latest survey results.

 

Any on-going maintenance would be funded from the revenue budgets for routine and reactive highway maintenance budgets, as and when required.

 

The investment project was originally anticipated to complete by April 2019 using existing highway maintenance contracts. As the existing contacts would now end in June 2018 following a changed procurement strategy for the new contracts, a capital spend profile of up to 80% carriageways and 20% footways was approved to complete the project using the existing highways contractors as far as possible.

 

Although London boroughs as Highway Authorities are responsible for maintaining the Borough Principal Road Network (BPRN), planned maintenance of the network is funded by Transport for London (TfL). However, due to reduced Government revenue grant from 2018/19 and a fall in passenger numbers for public transport, TfL notified boroughs that investment in proactive planned renewals on the BPRN and TfL Road Network (TLRN) would pause from 2018/19 to 2019/20. Although the highway investment project had successfully improved the condition of non-principal and unclassified roads, future planned maintenance of the roads was also paused until 2022/23 as part of the project’s business case. The network condition would therefore deteriorate with increased demand for reactive repairs; as such, BPRN maintenance would be limited to reactive works and localised patching until funding is available for planned maintenance.    

 

In discussion, Members were advised that Lansdowne Avenue, Orpington, and Morley Close, Orpington, had been added to the proposed list of Phase 5 schemes. In view of TfL’s investment pause for the Principal Road Network, it was possible to use alternative funding sources to continue works at Beckenham High Street e.g. TfL funding for other projects.  

 

RESOLVED that the Environment Portfolio Holder be recommended to:

 

(1)  agree that the schemes listed at Appendix ‘A’ to Report ES18020 form the next phase of the Council’s investment programme of planned highway maintenance for 2017/19; and

 

(2)  note the reduction in TfL funding for maintenance of the Borough Principal Road Network.

 

66.

LOWER SYDENHAM TO BROMLEY QUIETWAY PUBLIC CONSULTATION REPORT AND FINAL PROPOSALS pdf icon PDF 499 KB

Minutes:

Report ES18026

 

In reporting progress on the above Quietway, Report ES18026 outlined recent consultation outcomes on the route including a summary of non-questionnaire comments and responses from the London Cycling Campaign, Lewisham Cyclists, and the Metropolitan Police. Many consultation comments would help refine designs during the detailed design process and travel information would be evidence for future scheme development. 

 

Approval was sought for the route’s construction and interventions (following public consultation) and a funding application to TfL was proposed for additional interventions outlined in the report. The Executive Director of Environment and Community Services was recommended to have delegated authority for approving final designs, in consultation with Ward Members and the Portfolio Holder.  

 

A final estimate on scheme costs was difficult to provide in view of the Highways and Minor Works contracts being tendered. But at this stage the route’s overall cost was estimated at approximately £700k - an increase of £272.2k on previous estimates. The Executive was therefore asked to agree the increased cost and for the total sum in the capital programme to be revised to £700k (subject to TfL confirmation on the balance of funding). For some locations the proposed capital expenditure would reduce revenue maintenance funding in the medium term as assets will be renewed earlier than would have otherwise been the case.

 

Concerning the junction of Southend Road with Park Road and Foxgrove Road, Cllr Wells (Copers Cope) had indicated his support for closing Park Road to increase safety at the junction and reduce speed (officers also proposed modal filtering and a mini-roundabout with parallel zebra crossings to improve walking routes and the Quietway crossing Southend Road). Making the Quietway safer justified a closure of Park Road and Cllr Tickner (Copers Cope) indicated that pedestrians are hesitant to cross at the location given the safety risks. Cllr Tickner supported closing Park Road to motorised vehicles - a mini-roundabout further along the A2015 (Southend Road) at the junction with Brackley Road had proved effective and another mini-roundabout at the Southend Road/Park Road/Foxgrove Road junction would also be effective with Park Road closed. The Head of Traffic and Road Safety confirmed that Park Road could be closed and excessive driving speeds at the northern section of Copers Cope Road would also be addressed.

 

It was suggested that issues highlighted in responses from the London Cycling Campaign, Lewisham Cyclists and Metropolitan Police (Road Safety Engineering Unit) are dealt with first before proceeding further. A further report could then be considered when the issues are addressed - with Park Road closed in the meantime as proposed.

 

In regard to the Quietway crossing Beckenham Lane (A222) at Shortlands Village between Ravensbourne Avenue and Station Road, consultation was ongoing with Ward Members and more generally, the Council risked losing TfL funds for the scheme should it not be possible to deliver the current stage of development. Issues raised in consultation would be dealt with at detailed design stage with Metropolitan Police concerns taken into account. Officers had workable solutions  ...  view the full minutes text for item 66.

67.

GREENWICH TO KENT HOUSE QUIETWAY (BROMLEY SECTION) PUBLIC CONSULTATION REPORT AND FINAL PROPOSALS pdf icon PDF 1 MB

Minutes:

Report ES18027

 

Members were updated on progress with the above Quietway route.

 

Following a period of public consultation, approval was now sought for construction of the proposed route and interventions outlined in Report ES18027. Additional interventions were also proposed needing consultation and application to TfL for funding. Approval of final designs for the interventions – including additional interventions – was recommended for delegation to the Executive Director in consultation with Ward Members and the Portfolio Holder.

 

The report outlined consultation outcomes including a summary of responses to fixed response questions and a quantified analysis of comments from non-questionnaire responses.  Outcomes from an event managed by Sustrans to understand views of businesses in Kangley Bridge Road affected by the shared path proposals were also provided. Additionally, responses from the London Cycling Campaign, Lewisham Cyclists, and Metropolitan Police (Road Safety Engineering Unit and Designing Out Crime Officer) were outlined. Many of the consultation comments would help refine designs during the detailed design process and travel information would be used as evidence for future scheme development.

 

To improve safety and reduce potential conflict between pedestrians and cyclists, it was proposed to widen the River Pool shared path on to land owned by Harris Aspire Academy. For this purpose, Executive approval was sought for a net land acquisition of 180.8 sq.m.

 

The overall route was estimated to cost approximately £570k with £200k expected to be spent in 2018/19 and £370k in 2019/20 (a final estimate being difficult to calculate in view of the current Highways and Minor Works tendering). Accordingly, Executive approval was sought to increase the scheme cost by £135.3k and to revise the capital programme total to £570k, subject to TfL confirmation on the balance of funding. The overall cost included the cost of acquiring land to widen the River Pool Path. For some locations, the proposed capital expenditure will also reduce a need for revenue maintenance funding in the medium term as assets will be renewed earlier than would otherwise have been the case.  

 

Members supported the recommendations.

 

RESOLVED that:

 

(1)  progress made to date on the proposed Quietways be noted and proposals for extensions and additional interventions to strengthen the Borough’s bids to TfL be supported;

 

(2)  the Portfolio Holder be recommended to –

 

·  agree to an application being made to TfL for funding of the proposed additional interventions and to delegate approval of the final designs to the Executive Director of Environment and Community Services, in consultation with Ward Members and the Portfolio Holder; and

 

·  approve construction of the proposed route and interventions as set out at section 3 of Report ES18027 following public consultation with approval of final designs delegated to the Executive Director of Environment and Community Services, in consultation with Ward Members and the Portfolio Holder; and

 

(3) the Executive be recommended to:

 

·  approve the net acquisition of 180.8 sq.m. of land to be acquired from Harris Aspire to widen River Pool Path; and

 

·  proceed with the scheme and changes to increase the scheme  ...  view the full minutes text for item 67.

68.

VEHICLE FOOTWAY CROSSOVERS REVIEW pdf icon PDF 68 KB

Minutes:

Report ES18028

 

Approval was sought to a policy change for new or extended vehicle crossovers involving works to an existing grass verge.

 

As a Highway Authority using powers under Section 184 (11) of the Highways Act 1980, the Council has responsibility to grant and construct vehicle crossovers for off-street parking following a request from a property owner. Applications are considered in accordance with the Council’s policy and guidelines for crossovers to ensure they are dealt with consistently and fairly. 

 

The current policy for crossovers over an existing grass verge or amenity land permits a new crossing or extension of an existing crossing to a maximum width at the property boundary of 4.8m, with a similar width at the kerb line and a limit on the depth of a lowered crossover kerb of 3.0m with 0.9m ramp kerbs either side. A crossover over a grass verge would therefore involve amenity land loss of up to 14.4 square metres.   

 

As appeals had been upheld against a number of refused crossovers marginally exceeding the three-metre depth limit (on grounds that other properties in a road had existing crossovers), it was proposed to vary the policy to allow more flexibility in assessing applications without increasing the impact of such provision on the amenity land involved. Current guidance recommended a minimum crossover width of 3.6m consisting of 2.4m lowered kerbs with 0.6 m ramp kerbs on either side and the revised policy proposed to limit the overall area of a crossover across a grass verge to 14.4 square metres, which would, for example, allow a crossover 3.6m wide to be provided over a grass verge 4.0m deep.

 

Members supported the recommendations.

 

RESOLVED that the Environment Portfolio Holder be recommended to approve the changes to policies for provision of new or extended vehicle crossovers.

 

69.

PRE-DECISION SCRUTINY OF REPORT TO THE EXECUTIVE

Executive decision for pre-decision scrutiny.

 

70.

POT HOLE ACTION FUND pdf icon PDF 121 KB

Minutes:

Report ES18029

 

From the Government’s Pothole Action Fund for all English Highway Authorities (part of Local Transport Capital Block Funding) L B Bromley had been granted £112,940 for 2017/18 and the same amount for 2018/19.

 

Planned highway maintenance reduces demand for reactive maintenance, improves value for money and customer satisfaction, reduces unplanned network disruption, and contributes to reducing third party claims for damages. Although the highway investment project had improved the condition of non-principal and unclassified roads in the borough, reduced maintenance funding for the Borough Principal Road Network (BPRN) would increase demand on limited revenue budgets for highway maintenance. Accordingly, it was proposed that sums from the Pothole Action Fund supplement the revenue budgets for emergency and reactive works during the next two years. 

 

Members were advised of a trial in Thurrock where a refuse vehicle had been fitted with a camera to help identify potholes. A significant amount of data had been produced which would need to be processed and there would be benefits if a similar arrangement could be used for L B Bromley in future.  

 

Members supported the recommendations.

 

RESOLVED that the Executive be recommended to approve:

 

(1)  the draw-down of grant funding (held in Central Contingency) from the Department for Transport of £112,940 in 2017/18 and £112,940 during 2018/19 received as part of their Pothole Action Fund; and

 

(2)  carry forward of the unspent £112,940 allocation for 2017/18.

 

71.

STREET CLEANSING CONTRACT SCRUTINY pdf icon PDF 4 MB

Minutes:

Report ES18019

 

Members considered the performance of Kier Environmental Services for Street Cleansing.

 

Report ES18019 reviewed factors affecting cleanliness standards, examined trends in performance and public feedback/satisfaction levels, proposed improvements, and provided a focus for the strategy and direction of street environment services.

 

Key performance areas measuring street cleaning standards and effectiveness comprised:

 

·contractor performance monitoring following routine scheduled street cleaning operations;

·measuring public satisfaction with street cleanliness; and

·analysis of customer feedback/reports and trend information.

 

The contractor’s performance on cleanliness levels fell to satisfactory as measured from regular inspections and by mid-February 2018 235 default correction notices had been issued for works failing to meet required standards during 2017/18. 

 

The Neighbourhood Management client team undertake a minimum 23,200 inspections of footway and carriageway assets to provide 90% confidence that works are to required standards. The Neighbourhood Manager (Street Environment contracts) also undertakes a bi-monthly evaluation to ensure inspections are made to sufficient levels to meet monthly objectives. The client team was projected to undertake 22,500 annual inspections by the end of the year compared to 17,686 for 2016/17. Contract monitoring data in Report ES18019 outlined contractor performance during 2017/18.

 

The annual independent satisfaction survey indicated a maintenance of standards overall with 7% improvement in residents identifying their streets as ‘clean’ and an 8% improvement in residents noting a reduction of ‘dog fouling’. However, the survey scored autumnal leaf fall clearance less favourably from a residential street perspective and from a town centre perspective, levels of cigarette litter and chewing gum also scored less favourably (5% satisfaction reduction due to ‘cigarette ends’). Other littering issues were also identified, particularly those in country lanes, as was fly-tipping, particularly lower volume incidents, occurring in residential roads. Outcomes from the survey, including trend analysis, are used to focus resources on improvement.

 

From 2015 to 2017, the percentage of enquiries through Fix My Street (FMS) continued to rise although the overall level of enquiries reduced. On average 751 street cleansing enquiries were received per month via FMS with an average 10 day time period between reporting and fixing a problem. A reduction in street sweeping enquiries between October and November 2017 was the likely result of a changed approach to leaf removal. Autumn leafing had the lowest favourable score for residential streets in the 2017 survey and through a new methodology between 23rd October 2017 and 8th January 2018 removed tonnage increased 17.16% (by 29th January 2018) on levels removed in 2015 and 2016. Initial weeks of the programme focused on roads with a density of Horse Chestnut trees known to be first in shedding leaves.

 

The Heavily Parked Roads scheme launched last September focused cleansing resources on 136 local roads nominated by Councillors as having heavy residential and/or commuter parking. An alternative treatment schedule for the roads required action outside of ordinary working hours, particularly weekend and evening working, and prioritisation to channel cleansing and detritus removal (with litter removal maintained through existing schedules).

 

A new Street Scrubber machine had also been operating  ...  view the full minutes text for item 71.

72.

BLUE BADGE MISUSE pdf icon PDF 417 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report ES18025

 

Members were informed of activity by the Shared Parking Service to combat the criminal offence of Blue Badge misuse.

 

APCOA Civil Enforcement Officers (CEOs) carry out Inspections and ask drivers of vehicles displaying Blue Badge specific questions to determine whether or not misuse is taking place. CEOs and authorised Council Officers can legally confiscate a Blue Badge and return it to the issuing Local Authority should any misuse be suspected. 

 

High rates of prosecution success are achieved through close working with the Greenwich Fraud Team and for a second year the shared parking service engaged with Blue Badge holders through the Blue Badge Bulletin, raising awareness of Blue Badge rules and providing an update on the enforcement campaign. An online survey with Blue Badge holders also aimed to gauge awareness on aspects of the campaign and further initiatives included:

 

·  business cards allowing individuals to report misuse;

·  press releases to highlight each prosecution success;

·  stronger warning signs displayed in key areas on-street and in car parks;

·  a hotline and e-form on the Council’s website to report misuse;

·  distribution of feedback cards to encourage drivers to leave comments after a Blue Badge inspection (96% of feedback being positive); and

·  use of social media, e.g. Twitter, to raise awareness of the scheme.

 

Key intelligence from regular action days, where CEOs report each Blue Badge number seen on patrol, help pinpoint where badges are most used. Common trends are also recognised in badge misuse (e.g. display of a child’s badge during school hours or display of an elderly person’s badge outside a gym) and certain locations are targeted at certain times to tackle misuse. 

 

Use of the Blue Badge Improvement System (allowing Council officers to see details of a badge in real time) enabled on-street identification of a badge holder to compare with a driver or passenger. Any display of a lost, stolen or deceased person’s badge can also be identified.

 

Following a thorough investigation after confiscating a badge, evidence is collaborated and the case passed to the Greenwich Fraud Team. Results of the Fraud Team’s investigation are then sent to Parking Services and after a further look at the case by the Head of Parking Service, a recommendation is made to the Head of Audit to make a final decision on whether to prosecute. 

 

From January 2016 to February 2018:

 

·  165 badges were confiscated because of suspected misuse;

·  83 drivers were successfully prosecuted (including 11 prosecutions where a Penalty Charge Notice was issued);

·  54 warning letters were issued due to mitigating circumstances;

·  the driver could not be traced in nine cases; 

·  33 additional badges were obtained which had expired; and

·  30 cases remained open and under investigation (at the time of Report ES18025). 

 

Although overall badge confiscations had more than doubled, the amount of

L B Bromley badges confiscated within the borough had significantly decreased. Comprehensive training and support to CEOs as part of the enforcement campaign included matters related to the identification of Blue Badge misuse and inspection/confiscation  ...  view the full minutes text for item 72.

73.

FORWARD WORK PROGRAMME AND MATTERS ARISING pdf icon PDF 196 KB

Minutes:

Report ES18018

 

Prior to formal agreement by the Committee’s membership for the next Council Year, Members supported the Committee’s 2018/19 Work Programme. In so doing, the Chairman highlighted a need for the Committee to consider a further item this year (related to the new Highways Contracts). It was too late to consider the item at the Committee’s next scheduled meeting on 10th July 2018 and a special meeting of the Committee would be necessary in April 2018 before a decision is taken at a special Executive meeting (date to be confirmed).

 

Concerning Electric Vehicle Charging referred to in the progress report on previous requests appended to Report ES18018, a Member highlighted that a resident had already sold his electric vehicle as a charging point had been difficult to locate. The Portfolio Holder advised that 20 EV public charging points are already installed in the borough, their locations having been selected by Source London based upon addresses of their members in the borough. As such, officers worked with Source London to site the charging spaces at the charging point locations. The Portfolio Holder suggested that perhaps the resident was not a member of the Source London Scheme.

 

RESLOLVED that:

 

(1)  the Committee’s 2018/19 Forward Work Programme be noted;

 

(2)  progress concerning previous Committee requests be noted; and

 

(3)  a special meeting of the Committee be considered for a date in April 2018, prior to a special meeting of the Executive.

 

74.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1972 AS AMENDED BY THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT (ACCESS TO INFORMATION) (VARIATION) ORDER 2006, AND THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT 2000

The Chairman to move that the Press and public be excluded during consideration of the items of business listed below as it is likely in view of the nature of the business to be transacted or the nature of the proceedings that if members of the Press and public were present there would be disclosure to them of exempt information.

Minutes:

The following summary

refers to a matter

involving exempt information

 

 

75.

EXEMPT MINUTES OF THE ENVIRONMENT PDS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON 30TH JANUARY 2018

Minutes:

The Part 2 minutes were agreed.

 

As this was the last scheduled meeting of the Committee for 2017/18, the Chairman thanked Members and Officers for their support and contributions during the year.

 

Appendix A pdf icon PDF 82 KB

Additional documents:

 

Original Text: