Agenda and minutes

Venue: Bromley Civic Centre

Contact: Keith Pringle  020 8313 4508

Items
No. Item

15.

APOLOGIES FOR ABSENCE AND NOTIFICATION OF SUBSTITUTE MEMBERS

Minutes:

There were no apologies.

 

16.

DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST

Minutes:

There were no declarations.

 

17.

QUESTIONS FROM COUNCILLORS AND MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC ATTENDING THE MEETING

In accordance with the Council’s Constitution, questions to this Committee must be received in writing four working days before the date of the meeting. Therefore please ensure that questions are received by the Democratic Services Team by 5pm on Thursday 4th October 2018.

Minutes:

There were no questions to the Committee.

 

18.

MINUTES OF THE ENVIRONMENT PDS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON 10TH JULY 2018 pdf icon PDF 182 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes were agreed.

 

19.

QUESTIONS TO THE PORTFOLIO HOLDER FROM MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC AND COUNCILLORS ATTENDING THE MEETING

In accordance with the Council’s Constitution, questions to the Portfolio Holder must be received in writing four working days before the date of the meeting. Therefore please ensure that questions are received by the Democratic Services Team by 5pm on Thursday 4th October 2018.

Minutes:

Questions had been received for oral and written reply. Details of the questions and replies are at Appendix A.

 

20.

PRE-DECISION SCRUTINY OF REPORTS TO THE ENVIRONMENT PORTFOLIO HOLDER

Portfolio Holder decisions for pre-decision scrutiny.

20a

CAPITAL PROGRAMME MONITORING - 1ST QUARTER 2018/19 pdf icon PDF 79 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report FSD18078

 

At its meeting on 11th July 2018, the Executive agreed a revised Capital Programme for 2018/19 to 2021/22. Changes in respect of the Environment Portfolio were outlined and a revised programme for the portfolio presented along with the first quarter 2018/19 monitoring position. The 2017/18 Capital Outturn for the Portfolio was also provided and an under-spend of £3,020k from 2017/18 had been re-phased into 2018/19.

 

RESOLVED that the Portfolio Holder be recommended to note and confirm the changes agreed by the Executive on 11th July 2018.

 

20b

BROMLEY'S THREE YEAR TRANSPORT PLAN (LOCAL IMPLEMENTATION PLAN3 2019-2022) pdf icon PDF 109 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report ES18060

 

L B Bromley’s third Local Implementation Plan (LIP3) covers the period 2019/20 to 2021/22. It includes delivery proposals, targets, and outcomes the borough is seeking to achieve - identifying how L B Bromley will seek to work in a locally appropriate manner to achieve the Mayor’s Transport Strategy (MTS) objectives of:

 

·  Healthy Streets and healthy people;

·  A good public transport experience; and

·  New homes and jobs.

 

The LIP3 document also refers to longer term aspirations believed necessary to achieve MTS outcomes by 2041.

 

In discussion, a number of comments were made supporting the LIP3 document. Questions were also asked and views outlined.

 

For Bromley North, further transport is needed to match the level of residential population and officers are lobbying TfL to refresh a Bromley/Canary Wharf route option during a period of significant TfL innovation. 

 

Noting potential for a limited stop bus corridor between Beckenham and Bexleyheath (connecting to the tram network at Beckenham Junction), a Member highlighted that the 269 service already provides a route from Bexleyheath to Bromley. Concerning any interchange with the Elizabeth Line at Abbey Wood, the Member also suggested that a Bromley to Woolwich/ Silvertown tunnel route might be preferable. Nevertheless, officers supported a fast Beckenham/Bexleyheath service along with other bus measures in gaps where it is not possible for rail to deliver.

 

Reference was also made to the potential for express buses to Biggin Hill (as a Strategic Outer London Development Centre) to help improve bus service reliability, including improved service provision at Bank Holidays/weekends. Express buses will also help to promote tourism (e.g. to the new Biggin Hill Memorial Museum) but it will first be necessary to reduce congestion at Keston Mark junction. To this end, measures are being considered for a scheme to address the problem. 

 

A Member congratulated officers for the LIP document.  A further report can be presented to the Committee following public consultation but with a deadline to submit the document, officers needed time to review and comment on draft LIPs from other nearby boroughs (it was necessary to attract residents from other boroughs into Bromley).

 

As Chairman of the Bromley Health and Wellbeing Board, the Vice-Chairman commended the health contributions in the draft LIP document. The Chairman also indicated that delivery of the LIP3 intentions will provide a radical shift in transport. Roads are becoming congested and it is necessary to attract residents from cars to other transport modes. The Chairman was excited on what the document offered and hoped that stakeholders will comment on the Plan during consultation; he thanked the Senior Transport Planner for his work. Another Member also offered his thanks for the hard work in producing the document.

 

Concerning congestion adversely affecting bus reliability, technology measures, such as bus priority at traffic lights, are included in some schemes. On new school bus routes to support fewer school run trips it is easier to fit new routes in with TfL route scheduling. A good orbital network for bus routes is also  ...  view the full minutes text for item 20b

20c

LIVEABLE NEIGHBOURHOOD PROPOSALS pdf icon PDF 70 KB

Minutes:

Report ES18062

 

A proposed Liveable Neighbourhoods bid to TFL concerning Shortlands, Ravensbourne, and Bromley Better Villages (SRBBV) follows long-standing concern on conditions for walking, cycling, road safety, and congestion in the Shortlands station area.

 

The bid supports reduced congestion (through better journey time reliability at key junctions). congestion relief (through mode shift for short trips), increased levels of walking to school, reduced causalities, and the development of vibrant and thriving town centres.

 

Improvements will be made to the area of Shortlands station, including crossings for pedestrians, and safety improvements to the proposed Quietway cycle route through Shortlands. Better crossings and footpaths will also be included to encourage walking to school and measures to reduce KSIs. 

 

Through a Stakeholder Management Group, Sustrans is engaging with key stakeholders on behalf of the Council to understand concerns and aspirations for the area. Sustrans are also hosting on street ‘Pop Ups’ to engage with a wider audience to understand local views.

 

Successful bids are expected to be announced in February 2019 and a feasibility study and design work will then follow upon release of funds.  Should the Council be unsuccessful it will be necessary to re-group and consider whether to submit a further bid. Alternatively, a light version of the proposals can be undertaken. Sustrans were considered to be particularly effective with the consultation process.   

 

RESOLVED that the Portfolio Holder be recommended to approve submission of the Shortlands, Ravensbourne and Bromley Better Villages (SRBBV) bid as the Borough’s Liveable Neighbourhood bid to TfL for 2019/20.

 

20d

ORPINGTON: CROFTON ROAD CYCLE ROUTE pdf icon PDF 84 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report ES18063

 

Since outline proposals for a safe and segregated cycle facility on Crofton Road (A232) were approved in July 2017, public consultation had taken place as well as officer discussions with Ward Members and the Crofton Residents’ Association. A revised scheme design was produced taking into account a number of concerns and circulated to Ward Councillors and the Crofton Residents Association.

 

Representations received the previous day from a Ward Member on behalf of all Farnborough and Crofton Ward Members asked that the item be deferred for the Members to consider the new design and consult local residents. Given a short time since publication, it was also not possible for any Ward Member to attend the meeting. The item was therefore withdrawn from the agenda to provide Ward Members more time to consider the revised design and reach a view.

 

RESOLVED that the item be withdrawn.  

 

20e

STATION ROAD ORPINGTON - CONGESTION, WALKING AND CYCLING IMPROVEMENTS - INCLUDING LAND ACQUISTION pdf icon PDF 70 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report ES18065

 

Members considered a scheme to address congestion along the road corridor between Crofton Road and Station Road, Orpington (including Tubbenden Lane).

 

The Station Road/Tower Road junction in particular has congestion and safety issues and the footway at the eastbound bus stop on Station Road (opposite Tubbenden Lane) is narrow with bus passengers or passing pedestrians occasionally needing to step into the carriageway due to overcrowding. To address this, it was proposed to widen the footway and create a wider waiting area for bus users with room for pedestrians to pass. The pedestrian crossing facilities at the junction of Tubbenden Lane can also be improved.

 

To address the problem of vehicles queueing to enter Tower Road (the pinch point creating delays along Station Road), localised widening is proposed on the north side, prior to the junction with Hill View Road, requiring some 14.17m2 of third party land to be acquired from the land owner at number 30, with a further 1 m2 of land necessary from the land owner at number 32 (the land hopefully being acquired through negotiation rather than Compulsory Purchase). Modelling suggested the widening will save 24 seconds of lost time at the junction of Station Road / Tower Road / Hill View Road (during peak hours).

 

A contraflow cycle lane was also proposed along Hill View Road, linking to wider improvements being made for cyclists in the vicinity of Orpington Station.

 

The scheme was estimated to cost £98k, including the cost of implementation and land purchase, to be funded from the TfL LIP budget for Congestion Relief schemes. Any future maintenance costs would be funded from existing highways maintenance budgets.

 

Cllr Tony Owen (Petts Wood and Knoll) attended to speak on the item. Suggesting the pedestrian crossing close to the Maxwell presented the most significant contributor to traffic delay, Cllr Owen felt that it was necessary to assess the effect of the crossing on traffic flow.

 

Concerning proposals for Hill View Road, Cllr Owen explained that the road was formerly two-way but was changed to one-way traffic in view of a poor accident record when two-way. In view of the proposed cycle lane being contraflow, Cllr Owen considered it a perverse step to send cyclists along Hill View Road to Station Road. Cllr Owen indicated that a contraflow cycle lane can sometimes have “near- misses”. Hill View Road is also undulating. 

 

He also questioned the level of cycling demand to Orpington station. Should there be genuine cycle usage to the station, Cllr Owen suggested an alternative route using a station approach (private road) via an alley (currently a public footpath) just before the junction of Hill View Road with Hill View Crescent. With the issues highlighted, Cllr Owen felt the Hill View Road proposal should not be pursued.

 

The Assistant Director, Traffic and Parking, explained that colleagues were looking at the services approach road to the station and had spoken with Network Rail (landowners) about the road. He added that use of  ...  view the full minutes text for item 20e

20f

PROPOSED MAKING-UP OF CLARENCE ROAD, BICKLEY (PART) - FIRST RESOLUTION pdf icon PDF 67 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report ES18061

 

A First Resolution, under the Private Street Works Code in the Highways Act 1980, was sought to make up and adopt, as a highway maintainable at the public expense, Clarence Road, Bickley between Page Heath Lane and Southlands Grove. Clarence Road is not in a condition meeting adoptable standards and the Council is not therefore responsible for its maintenance, including repair.

 

Under provisions of the Private Street Works Code, Section 236 of the Highways Act 1980 enables the Council, as the Street Works Authority, to resolve to bear the whole of the cost of the works for making-up the Highway for adoption, rather than recharge most of the cost to the frontage owners. In this case, it is proposed to meet the cost of the works from the LIP budget.

 

Clarence Road crosses a railway via a bridge considered to be weak in condition, with a maximum 13 tonnes limit. An experimental road closure between the southern boundary of 62 Clarence Road and the driveway access to numbers 79-87 Clarence Road would prohibit all vehicles except pedestrians, pedal cycles, and Network Rail vehicles engaged on bridge maintenance. The closure would be reviewed after six months with a view to making it permanent. Works over the bridge could then be to reduced design standards compared with remaining parts of the street which will require a Resolution of Approval to be made under the Private Street Works Code. The completed scheme would also support Bromley’s ambition to promote quality cycle routes in the borough.

 

Policy T14 of the Unitary Development Plan (UDP) adopted in July 2006 explains that un-adopted highways will normally be considered for making–up and adoption, as resources permit and following a referendum. However, a referendum is not part of the statutory procedure, and in exceptional circumstances, can be dispensed with. Where, in this case, there is a clear demand for the Council to take action and it is not proposed to charge the making-up cost to the frontage owners, a referendum is not recommended. 

 

The estimated cost of the works at £332k will be funded from the TfL LIP Formula Funding Budget 2018/19 for Cycling and Walking. Future maintenance costs will be contained within existing highway maintenance budgets.

 

In discussion, it was explained that it is necessary to adopt and make-up the road for inclusion as a cycle route - its condition currently being unsuitable for cycling. When made up, the road (along a quiet residential street) will help to promote cycling away from busier routes, particularly as part of a route from Bromley to Orpington. There was an aspiration to extend the Lower Sydenham to Bromley Quietway on to Orpington and should this be taken forward, expenditure at this stage on the Clarence Road part of the route will mean less investment at a later stage. 

 

Members supported the recommendations to the Portfolio Holder.

 

RESOLVED that the Portfolio Holder be recommended to:

 

(1) make a first resolution under Section 205 (i) of the Highways Act 1980  ...  view the full minutes text for item 20f

20g

CROYDON ROAD RECREATION GROUND BANDSTAND RESTORATION pdf icon PDF 92 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report ES18072

 

Members supported funding proposals for the restoration of the Croydon Road Recreation Ground bandstand, Beckenham.

 

A specialist structural survey in 2013 identified the bandstand’s condition as deteriorating with significant repair works needed to prevent further decline and ultimate removal of the asset. Croydon Road is the last remaining bandstand in Council ownership. With significant local support for the restoration, the Friends Group at Croydon Road Recreation Ground and other partners, including Memory of a Free Festival, have been actively fundraising towards the cost of repair works.

 

The current bandstand floor space is insufficient to accommodate some performance groups (e.g. an orchestra) and temporary staging will be purchased and a flat base circular pathway incorporated into the design to maximise space. Such improvements will ease utilisation of the bandstand by musical and theatrical groups.

 

Although a previous application under The Heritage Lottery Fund’s (HLF) ‘Heritage Grant’ programme was unsuccessful in 2015, a revised one-stage application is currently being prepared under the ‘Our Heritage’ programme providing grants from £10k - £100k. With the level of match-funds secured, required funding has reduced to less than £100k. As lead applicant, L B Bromley will receive all grant money with idverde and the Friends of Croydon Road Recreation Ground acting as delivery partners. Amey Ltd will procure and oversee delivery of the capital restoration works and idverde will deliver the remainder of the project.

 

Report ES18072 also outlined the terms and conditions of grant should an application be successful. A grant application is expected to be submitted during November 2018 with notification of the outcome expected during January 2019.

 

 

Amey Ltd carried out a competitive tender for the major repair works in February 2018 using their own preferred supplier list and the cost for the work based on the lowest tender and inclusive of fees, was estimated at £191k. Amey’s preferred supplier agreed to hold their tender price until summer 2019, to allow the HLF bid to be processed. Additionally, a number of minor works are valued at £14k (funded from the HLF grant), including the design, production and installation of an interpretation panel and staging enabling increased use of the bandstand.

 

A total project budget of £245k over a 12 month period is required, inclusive of a 10% contingency throughout the project, split between capital works, equipment, and associated project management costs, at approximately £205k, and revenue costs estimated at £40k. An application is expected to be made for a grant of £89k with the balance of £156k coming from match-funding.

 

Should the application be successful, the project is anticipated to commence in March 2019 with three grant instalments: 50% up-front; 40% on expenditure of the first instalment; and 10% on completion of the project. Subject to grant timings, capital works could commence late spring 2019 and complete by summer 2019. Expenditure on events and activities to encourage use of the bandstand is expected to be on-going throughout 2019 into 2020.

 

Following notification of a successful grant application, a  ...  view the full minutes text for item 20g

21.

ECS PERFORMANCE OVERVIEW pdf icon PDF 120 KB

A Performance Monitoring overview of the Environment and Community Services (ECS) Portfolio is provided to each meeting of the Committee.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Members considered the latest performance monitoring overview. This comprised performance indicators, targets, and a RAG status for each indicator. Where appropriate, quarterly and monthly data was also provided along with a high/low assessment of good performance. Commentary against each indicator provided further information.

 

An updated version of the overview tabled for the meeting (Appendix B) included the following adjusted targets (more ambitious):

 

·  120 missed bins per 100,000 homes (Indicator ES6 - Waste and Recycling Collections – homes missed); and

 

·  47,000 hours of work by Friends of Parks Volunteers for 2018/19 (ES25 - Number of Hours Worked by Friends of Parks Volunteers).

 

Members considered four areas indicating a performance concern as outlined below.

 

ES6 Waste and Recycling Collections – Homes Missed (Amber Status)

 

Although the number of missed collections increased in July, the level had started to decrease and a briefing note tabled for Members (Appendix C) outlined the corrective action being taken to address the problem. Veolia’s South East London Regional Manager also attended for the item.

 

The Assistant Director of Environment outlined several reasons contributing to poor performance in July:

 

·  the target having been stretched for 2018/19;

 

·  an increased level of vehicle breakdowns as the current contract cycle comes to an end (many vehicles having been obtained at the start of the contract);

 

·  increased reliance upon temporary labour in the summer period as holiday cover;

 

·  some online missed bin reports relate to collections not made by 10am whereas collections can be made up to 4pm; and

 

·  bin collection performance traditionally dips during the summer.

 

A future contractor will be expected to use vehicles with in-cab technology so that vehicle movements can be tracked and recorded. Problems associated with vehicle breakdown affect the waste and recycling service as a whole including collections from recycling banks. Although a significant challenge to source replacement vehicles, vehicles have been brought to L B Bromley from other Veolia contracts; however, it is first necessary to revamp them with L B Bromley livery or make them look neutral.

 

Between now and the start of the new contract, Veolia’s delivery of a Corrective Action Plan will improve performance towards the new missed bin target. Action already taken by Veolia included provision of additional resource and moving other (younger) vehicles to the L B Bromley contract. Some vehicles are now 12 years old. The Portfolio Holder suggested that consequences might not have been expected following an earlier extension of the current contract.   

 

Although difficult to compare performance in L B Bromley like-for-like with other boroughs, performance in Bromley was generally good until the recent vehicle problems. Workshop changes and a new compliance officer and manager would also help improvement. Improvement was beginning to be seen and the Assistant Director felt that service performance will be back to normal by November.

 

NI 47 People Killed or Seriously Injured in Road Traffic Accidents (Red Status)

 

A briefing note (Appendix D) was tabled for Members concerning Indicators NI 47 and ES7.

 

For NI 47 the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 21.

22.

CONTRACTS REGISTER pdf icon PDF 158 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report ES18058

 

From the Contracts Register presented to Contracts Sub-Committee on

19th September 2018, Members received an extract for the Environment and Community Services Portfolio. A further copy provided under Part 2 proceedings included commentary for each contract.

 

Concerning the four lots of the Environmental Services Contract, the Director of Environment highlighted that the final stages of the tender process with bidders had been reached. Officers were hoping to have final bids returned in the following week. It was intended to report outcomes from the process to the Committee’s meeting on 20th November 2018 and to the Executive on 28th November 2018.

 

RESOLVED that the £50k+ Contracts Register (which also forms part of the Council’s commitment to data transparency) appended to Report ES18058 be noted.

 

23.

FLY-TIPPING ACTION INITIATIVE pdf icon PDF 446 KB

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Report ES18074

 

In 2016 Council agreed that £250k be set aside as a one-off initiative to combat environmental crime, with a particular focus on fly-tipping.  

 

Supported by the Fly-Tipping Working Group, a three-pronged approach is taken to tackle fly-tipping across the borough:

 

·  Target Hardening through structures and/or street furniture such as height barriers and width restrictors at known hotspots;

 

·  Proactive Enforcement e.g. joint Police operations, greater use of CCTV, and investigating the potential of other technologies; and

 

·  Environmental Enforcement Communications, raising the profile of the problem to reduce incidents and provide further information for residents and businesses to make better decisions on handling waste.

 

In 2017/18 total fly-tipping incidents reduced by 5.5% although the total number of enforcement actions also declined. To date, the Fly-Tipping Action Plan (FTAP) had delivered a targeted communication campaign with appearances in local periodicals and a range of semi-permanent signs/information leaflets with a consistent brand. The Action Plan also delivered mutli-agency stop and search operations, raising awareness across targeted groups of the Council’s intention towards enforcing waste regulation requirements.

 

The enforcement group also investigated an improved use of potential CCTV devices for evidence in supporting prosecutions and to provide a deterent at potential fly-tipping hotspots. Ten mobile covert ‘trail’ cameras at known fly-tipping hotspots are also to be purchased with the potential option of using overt CCTV units at more public sites e.g. on-street recycling banks.

 

Significant focus has also been given to target hardening and detering potential fly-tipping incidents from illegal encampments. The interim High Court Injunction, providing a borough-wide deterrent to illegal encampments at parks, open spaces, and Council car parks, is a recent success.

 

The Fly-Tipping Working Group was also relaunched recently (with revised terms of refrence) to enable delivery of the following outcomes:

 

·  Less fly-tipping incidents in the borough/key hotspots;

·  Less graffiti, litter and abandoned vehicles;

·  Less breaches of highways licences;

·  Increased enforcement activity (prosecution/fines);

·  Improved communication through a targeted Communications Plan; and

·  Increased resident satisfaction.

 

The FTAP appended to Report ES18074 detailed actions being delivered, planned, and proposed.

 

Members were advised that enforcement matters are covered by the Public Protection and Enforcement Portfolio with matters related to parks and target hardening covered by the Environment and Community Services Portfolio. Fly-tipping action therefore covered both portfolios - the Executive Director being responsible for agreeing expenditure (with the portfolios) against the earmarked reserve.

 

As material left outside recycling banks is technically fly-tipping, officers look to prosecute in such circumstances. On individuals from Kent looking to illegally fly-tip in the borough it was suggested that Kent agencies further assist with enforcement at border locations. However, it was confirmed that officers do share intelligence with Kent enforcement agencies and it’s possible to target locations where fly-tippers arrive into the borough. Road layout is important for such operations.  

 

RESOLVED that:

 

(1)  the contents of the action plan be noted; and

 

(2) a six-monthly update report on progress of the action plan be presented to a future meeting.

 

24.

FORWARD WORK PROGRAMME & MATTERS ARISING pdf icon PDF 91 KB

Minutes:

Report ES18057

 

Subject to certain changes (see below), Members agreed the Committee’s Work Programme for 2018/19.

 

Concerning the Food Waste Campaign (for report to the Committee on 5th February 2019), the Director of Environment explained that funding from WRAP will be used to promote increased levels of food waste recycling in areas of lowest uptake in the borough. The Director listed relevant wards and with some monitoring of rounds continuing, a doorstep campaign would then follow, including a distribution of food waste caddy liners.  

 

RESLOLVED that:

 

(1)  the Committee’s 2018/19 Forward Work Programme be agreed subject to -

 

·  a post-consultation report on LIP3 being provided to the Committee’s meeting on 5th February 2019;

 

·  APCOA being invited to the Committee’s meeting on 5th February 2019 to account for performance on the Parking Services Contract;

 

·  the Committee’s final meeting of 2018/19 being moved from

12th March 2019 to 9th April 2019; and

 

·  JB Riney & Co Ltd being invited to the Committee’s meeting on  9th April 2019 to account for performance of its contract for the Major Highway Works contract and the Minor Highways Works Contract; and

 

(2)  progress concerning previous Committee requests be noted.

 

25.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1972 AS AMENDED BY THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT (ACCESS TO INFORMATION) (VARIATION) ORDER 2006, AND THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT 2000

The Chairman to move that the Press and public be excluded during consideration of the items of business listed below as it is likely in view of the nature of the business to be transacted or the nature of the proceedings that if members of the Press and public were present there would be disclosure to them of exempt information.

26.

EXEMPT MINUTES OF THE ENVIRONMENT PDS COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON 10TH JULY 2018

Minutes:

The exempt minutes were agreed.

 

27.

CONTRACTS REGISTER

Part 2 (Exempt) version of the ECS Contracts Register.

Minutes:

Members noted a Part 2 £50k+Contracts Register extract for the Environment and Community Services Portfolio which included commentary on most of the contracts listed.

 

Appendix A pdf icon PDF 104 KB

Appendix B pdf icon PDF 125 KB

Appendix C pdf icon PDF 67 KB

Appendix D pdf icon PDF 42 KB

 

Original Text: